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Heat Stress Hazard Assessment and Control

    Title:

    Heat Stress Hazard Assessment and Control

    Publication date:

    11/12/2014

    Effective date:

    5/20/2011

    BRIEF

    Policy Summary

    Berkeley Lab's Heat Stress Policy addresses the hazards of heat stress at the Laboratory site by:

    • Listing the different symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke
    • Identifying emergency response actions when someone is determined to be suffering from heat stress
    • Providing preventative measures to avoid heat stress

    Who Should Read This Policy

    All Berkeley Lab employees, casual and participating visitors, affiliates, and subcontractors

    To Read the Full Policy, Go To:

    The POLICY tab on this wiki page

    To Read the ES&H Program Details, Go To:

    http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/pub3000/CH40.html

    Contact Information

    Heat Stress Subject Matter Expert
    EHSS Division

    Title:

    Heat Stress Hazard Assessment and Control

    Publication date:

    11/12/2014

    Effective date:

    5/20/2011

    POLICY

    A. Purpose

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Heat Stress Policy addresses the hazards of heat stress at the Laboratory site by:

    • Listing the different symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke
    • Identifying emergency response actions when someone is determined to be suffering from heat stress
    • Providing preventative measures to avoid heat stress

    B. Persons Affected

    All Berkeley Lab employees, casual and participating visitors, affiliates, and subcontractors

    C. Exceptions

    None

    D. Policy Statement

    1. Heat stress — the physical stress of hot environments — can be influenced by a combination of factors, such as type of clothing worn, physical activity, time spent working, breaks between work activities, and medications; and environmental factors such as ambient air temperature, air velocity, and relative humidity (Work Process A).
    2. Self-awareness is a key step to reducing heat-related disorders. Employees and supervisors should terminate exposure to heat stress at the onset of the first symptoms (Work Process A).
    3. When interior temperatures exceed the recommended guidance range of 65°F to 85°F, division directors, unit heads, and supervisors should use their discretion in modifying employee work assignments, including changes in location, changes in time of beginning or end of workday, sharing duties, etc. Line managers should consider employee medical and physical conditions when applying this temperature range as a guideline (Work Process C).
    4. Heat-related disorders can be caused by prolonged periods of heat stress. Heat exhaustion occurs when the body's ability to regulate body temperature is overwhelmed but not completely broken down. Heatstroke is a life-threatening emergency that requires immediate medical attention. Heatstroke is more likely to occur in outdoor work (Work Process D).

    E. Roles and Responsibilities

    Role

    Responsibilities

    All Berkeley Lab Supervisors and Building Managers

    • Arrange first-aid training for workers
    • Monitor the workplace to determine when hot conditions arise
    • Whenever possible, schedule hot jobs for the cooler part of the day
    • Ensure workers drink enough water
    • Adjust work practices as necessary when workers experience heat stress
    • Make adjustments for workers who must wear personal protective clothing and equipment that retains heat and restricts evaporation of sweat

    Workers

    • Follow instructions and training for controlling heat stress
    • Recognize the potential for heat stress in the work environment
    • Be alert to symptoms in oneself and others
    • Avoid consumption of excessive caffeine, which can contribute to heat stress
    • Drink small amounts of water regularly to avoid dehydration
    • Use personal protective equipment (PPE) appropriately

    Facilities Division — Inspection Group

    Issues Stop Work notices to contractors in noncompliance with the Berkeley Lab heat stress program

    Facilities Division — Maintenance and Operations (M&O)

    • Provides fans and other means to increase airflow or ventilation in hot work areas
    • Audits work performed by contractors to ensure compliance. Informs the Inspection Groups of noncompliance.

    Industrial Hygiene Group

    • Provides project-specific guidance and recommendations
    • Helps managers determine an appropriate work/rest regime for workers

    F. Definitions/Acronyms

    Term

    Definition

    Action Level

    Level of concern where a corrective action is taken

    Contractor

    A contractor employed by Berkeley Lab. Both the contractor and the work crew will be non-Berkeley Lab employees.

    PPE (personal protective equipment)

    Safety equipment worn by employees; may include safety glasses, respirators, coveralls, gloves, etc.

    Thermal Radiation

    Transfer of heat from hot objects through air to the body. Working around heat sources such as furnaces will increase heat stress. Working in direct sunlight can substantially increase heat stress.

    High Humidity

    A condition under which the rate of evaporation of sweat from the skin decreases. If air temperature is as warm as or warmer than the skin during times of high humidity, blood brought to the body's surface cannot dissipate heat.

    Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index (WBGT)

    The most-used technique to measure environmental factors that most nearly correlate with deep body temperature and other physiological responses to heat

    G. Recordkeeping Requirements

    None

    H. Implementing Documents

    Document number

    PUB-3000 Reference

    Title

    Type

    07.07.016.001

    Chapter 40

    Heat Stress

    Program

    07.07.016.002

    Chapter 40, Work Process A

    General Requirements

    Work Process

    07.07.016.003

    Chapter 40, Work Process B

    Control of Heat Stress

    Work Process

    07.07.016.004

    Chapter 40, Work Process C

    Heat Stress Screening Threshold

    Work Process

    07.07.016.005

    Chapter 40, Work Process D

    Heat Stress Emergencies

    Work Process

    I. Contact Information

    Heat Stress Subject Matter Expert
    EHSS Division

    J. Revision History

    Date

    Revision

    By whom

    Revision Description

    Section(s) affected

    Change Type

    1/2/2012

    0

    Toor

    Rewrite for wiki (brief)

    All

    Minor

    9/25/2012

    1

    Toor

    Rewrite for wiki (policy)

    All

    Minor

    8/7/2014 1 Young Adjust Next Review based on Pub date Doc Info Editorial
    11/12/2014 1.1 Best Editorial changes during three-year review   Minor

    DOCUMENT INFORMATION

    Title:

    Heat Stress Hazard Assessment and Control

    Document number

    07.07.016.000

    Revision number

    1.1

    Publication date:

    11/12/2014

    Effective date:

    5/20/2011

    Next review date:

    11/12/2017

    Policy Area:

    Industrial Hygiene and Safety

    RPM Section (home)

    ESH

    RPM Section (cross-reference)

    none

    Functional Division

    EHSS

    Prior reference information (optional)

     

    Source Requirements Documents

    • 29 CFR 1910.132(d), Hazard Assessment and Equipment Selection

    • General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1), Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970

    • ACGIH 2005 TLVs and BEIs, Physical Agents, Heat Stress and Strain

    Implementing Documents

    Document number

    PUB-3000 Reference

    Title

    Type

    07.07.016.001

    Chapter 40

    Heat Stress

    Program

    07.07.016.002

    Chapter 40, Work Process A

    General Requirements

    Work Process

    07.07.016.003

    Chapter 40, Work Process B

    Control of Heat Stress

    Work Process

    07.07.016.004

    Chapter 40, Work Process C

    Heat Stress Screening Threshold

    Work Process

    07.07.016.005

    Chapter 40, Work Process D

    Heat Stress Emergencies

    Work Process

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