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Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Title:

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Publication date:

    12/13/2013

    Effective date:

    12/13/2013

    BRIEF

    Policy Summary

    The Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) provides requirements and guidance for the safe handling, use, and storage of hazardous materials in laboratory, shop, and office settings. This plan identifies responsibilities and establishes procedures for identifying, evaluating, and controlling hazardous materials.

    Who Should Read This Policy

    Berkeley Lab employees, visitors, affiliates, and subcontractors

    To Read the Full Policy, Go To:

    The POLICY tab on this wiki page

    To Read the ES&H Program Details, Go To:

    http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/index.shtml

    Contact Information

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Program Manager
    EHS Division

    Title:

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Publication date:

    12/13/2013

    Effective date:

    12/13/2013

    POLICY

    A. Purpose

    The Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) provides requirements and guidance for the safe handling, use, and storage of hazardous materials in laboratory, shop, and office settings. This plan identifies responsibilities and establishes procedures for identifying, evaluating, and controlling hazardous materials.

    B. Persons Affected

    This policy applies to Berkeley Lab employees, visitors, affiliates, and subcontractors.

    C. Exceptions

    The CHSP does not apply to the following:

    • Articles: An article is a manufactured item such as an O-ring or a steel rod that is formed to a specific shape and, when used under normal conditions, does not release more than very small quantities of a hazardous chemical and does not pose a physical hazard or health risk to employees. Items such as welding/brazing rods, which may produce metal fumes when used, are hazardous materials and do not meet this exception.
    • Materials derived from biological sources: These fall under the provisions of the Berkeley Lab Biosafety Manual.

    D. Policy Statement

    1. General Requirements (Work Process A). Work involving chemicals at Berkeley Lab will be conducted in a manner that minimizes employee exposure to hazards by utilizing chemical substitution, engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, work practice controls, and emergency procedures. The hazards of chemicals and the control are described in the CHSP.
    2. Chemical and Equipment Procurement Procedures (Work Process B). Some chemicals and equipment have inherent safety hazards that require special safety controls and authorizations. It is important that these controls are in place before the material is purchased and used on site. Several materials of concern are listed in the Restricted Items List that is maintained by the Procurement & Property Management Department in consultation with the Environment/Health/Safety (EHS) Division. The Laboratory has a notification and approval procedure for these materials that is initiated at the time of procurement
    3. Transporting Hazardous Materials (Work Process C)
      1. Hazardous Materials Transported by Transportation Services or a Department of Transportation–Authorized Carrier: Transporting hazardous materials by employees in public transportation (such as the shuttle bus) or in private or government vehicles, is not permitted (except as outlined below). Instead, use Transportation Services or a Department of Transportation–authorized carrier This is to minimize risk to Laboratory employees and the public, and ensures that the federal and state laws regarding packaging, manifesting, and placarding hazardous materials are met.
      2. Transporting Small Quantities of Hazardous Materials by Laboratory Employees, Subcontractors, and Affiliates Casual and Participating Guests: Berkeley Lab staff may move small quantities of hazardous materials for short distances within a building or between adjacent buildings, provided that it can be done safely and without spilling the materials. Individuals must use handcarts and drip trays (to contain any spilled material). Employees must also complete EHS0348 Chemical Hygiene and Safety training (or EHS0345 for Facilities personnel).
      3. Transporting Research Samples, Hazardous Materials, and Field Sampling Materials by Berkeley Lab Staff: Berkeley Lab staff may transport research samples and small quantities of hazardous materials by hand or in a passenger vehicle under the conditions defined by the CHSP. This applies to transporting research samples (including engineered nanomaterials) and hazardous chemicals between non-adjacent buildings at the main LBNL site, the main LBNL site and other LBNL sites (e.g., Donner, Potter, JBEI, JGI), any LBNL site and other collaborating research organization (e.g., UC Berkeley and Stanford) and transporting small quantities of hazardous materials to and from field locations not readily served by common carriers such as FedEx and UPS. Packaging, labeling and hazard communication requirements must be followed.
    4. Chemical Inventory (Work Process D)
      1. Berkeley Lab Sitewide Chemical Inventory: The purpose of the sitewide chemical inventory is to provide chemical users, EHS staff, and emergency response teams with accurate and up-to-date lists of chemicals that are stored on site. Furthermore, the chemical inventory meets Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and city of Berkeley regulations. The inventory is also used to categorize chemicals into their respective hazard classes and utilize this information as a tool to a) identify users of particular materials; b) communicate hazard information, including special controls or procedures; and c) assist EHS in helping chemical users to determine whether exposure assessments are needed.
      2. It is the owner's responsibility to ensure that all hazardous chemicals/materials for which they are responsible are entered into the Chemical Management System (CMS) as soon as possible and that all chemicals are removed from the inventory when the materials have been used up, disposed of, or taken off site.
      3. Guidance for the Chemical Management System Program. This information is detailed in Work Process D.
    5. Chemical Hazards: Descriptions (Work Process E)
      1. Definition of Hazardous Chemicals: This section provides resources and information that can be used to evaluate the hazards of chemicals. The terms used in this section are listed in the CHSP Program Glossary of Terms. The OSHA Hazard Communication Standard defines a hazardous chemical as a chemical that is either a health hazard or a physical hazard. These terms and others such as particularly hazardous substances and engineered nanomaterials are defined in the following sections of the CHSP Program, Work Process E:
        1. Particularly Hazardous Substances
        2. Engineered Nanomaterials
    6. Chemical Hazard Assessment (Work Process F). Hazard assessments are conducted to identify the hazards and general controls for work environments where workers may have physical or chemical exposures. These assessments can be performed by line management or an ESH professional. Hazard assessments may precede Exposure Assessments are conducted by EHS professionals to ensure that protective measures are implemented and to ensure worker health compliance with applicable regulations or other requirements. Exposure assessments are required prior to issuing and using respiratory protection equipment.
      1. Job Hazards Analysis (JHA): A JHA is the overall work-authorization document that analyzes the tasks that a worker performs, the hazards associated with those tasks, and the controls necessary to perform the work safely. The JHA process is given in the ES&H Manual Job Hazards Analysis program. All work at Berkeley Lab must be authorized through the JHA. Work may not be performed until the JHA is complete, the work is authorized by the work lead, and the proper controls as specified by the JHA are in place.
      2. Activity Hazard Documents: OSHA mandates employers to identify higher hazard work that requires prior approval. At Berkeley Lab, this is accomplished with the Activity Hazard Document (AHD). An AHD is a formal work authorization that lists controls and procedures to reduce the risks associated with a higher-hazard activity to an acceptable level. AHDs are incorporated into the Job Hazards Analysis by reference. The principal investigator (PI) or supervisor must identify and evaluate all potential hazards associated with a proposed project or activity and develop measures to reduce these hazards to an acceptable level. He/she must also determine whether an AHD is needed. The AHD is required to be completed before work is initiated.
    7. General Controls for Hazardous Materials (Work Process G)
      1. Technical Areas: Technical areas include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas where non-administrative activities are performed. For the purpose of the Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan, "non-administrative" refers to activities that involve a chemical hazard. Offices and conference rooms are generally not technical areas. 
      2. Standard Operating Procedures: Standard Operating Procedures for all chemicals at Berkeley Lab are developed to minimize employee exposure to hazards by utilizing chemical substitution, engineering controls, administrative controls, personal protective equipment, work practice controls, and emergency procedures. 
      3. Chemical Use, Selection, and Substitution:Before a chemical or a product is introduced or used in a workplace, the work lead must:
        1. Review the hazards of the material and assess the conditions under which it will be used.
        2. Determine whether the chemical can be substituted with a safer chemical alternative.
        3. Determine whether the chemical can be borrowed from someone within the research group or the division. If the chemical must be purchased, keep working quantities of all hazardous materials to a minimum. Procure, use, and store the minimum amount of material required.
        4. Determine whether the chemical is a restricted item (See the definition of "restricted items" at the Procurement & Property Management Web page).
    8. Selection and Use of Engineering Controls (Work Process H). Engineering controls, including local exhaust ventilation systems, laboratory fume hoods, enclosures, and shields, must be used. Except for substitution for a less hazardous chemical, these provide the most effective means of control.
    9. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) (Work Process I). PPE is to be used as a supplement to, but not as a substitute for, engineering controls. PPE includes chemically resistant gloves, eyewear, footwear, lab coats, aprons, coveralls, and respiratory protection. PPE may be used as a sole means of control if the use of other controls is not feasible. PPE is provided at no personal expense to the individual. To be effective, employees must understand the proper selection, use, and limitations of PPE. 
      1. General Personal Protective Equipment Requirements
      2. Minimum Personal Protective Equipment Requirements
      3. Area PPE Requirements: Area PPE requirements must be established for all technical areas. This is the responsibility of the area safety leader through consultation with supervisors and work leads. Area PPE requirements must be listed on the Berkeley Lab technical area entrance placard. Area PPE requirements apply to the entire technical area unless an exception is granted in accordance with the procedure described in the ES&H Manual Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) program.
        1. Minimum area PPE requirements for technical areas are as follows (Specific PPE requirements are found in the CHSP Program, Work Process I):
          1. Safety glasses with side shields
          2. Closed-toe shoes
          3. Long pants
    10. Work Practice Controls (Work Process J)
      1. Work Practice and Administrative Controls
        1. Work practice controls include preplanning work, practicing good housekeeping, and personal hygiene to minimize exposure to hazardous materials, and using common sense. Work practice controls must be used regardless of the type of hazardous material handled.
        2. Administrative controls include formal authorizations, written procedures, employee training, establishing designated or restricted areas, chemical procurement procedures, and preventive maintenance.
      2. Specific Controls and Procedures: Hazard identification and control are specified for the following classes of materials (Work Processes L through T linked below). Control requirements include training and information, substitution and chemical management, engineering controls, work practices, personal protective equipment, storage, and emergency procedures.
    11. Chemical Storage Guidelines (Work Practice K)
      1. Safe storage practices include segregating incompatible chemicals, using approved storage cabinets and refrigerators, and selecting chemically resistant secondary containment and drip trays.
      2. User knowledge, chemical incompatibility tables, labels, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs), and Industrial Hygiene consultation may be used to determine chemical incompatibility.
    12. Specific Controls and Procedures – Acids and Bases (Work Process L)
    13. Specific Controls and Procedures – Particularly Hazardous Substances: Carcinogens, Reproductive Toxins, and Acute Toxins (Work Practice M)
    14. Specific Controls and Procedures – Flammables and Combustible Liquids (Work Process N)
    15. Specific Controls and Procedures – Laser Dyes and Solvents (Work Process O)
    16. Specific Controls and Procedures – Peroxide-Forming Compounds (Work Process P)
    17. Specific Controls and Procedures – Water Reactive Chemicals (Work Process Q)
    18. Specific Controls and Procedures – Pyrophoric Materials (Work Process R)
    19. Specific Controls and Procedures – Engineered Nanomaterials (Work Process S)
    20. Specific Controls and Procedures – Chemicals with Explosive Properties (Work Process T)
    21. Decommissioning Equipment, Buildings, Laboratories, and Shop Spaces (Work Process U). Decommissioning Laboratory and Shop Spaces. All surfaces and equipment should be cleaned and put into a safe condition prior to vacating, transferring, or relocating Laboratory and shop spaces. The Laboratory's Space Management Policy in the Requirements and Procedures Manual mandates that laboratory and shop spaces be cleared of debris and contamination prior to transfer of ownership. This is to safeguard the health and safety of Facilities, Transportation and subcontractor personnel who work in these areas during facility demolition, renovation and construction. It also prevents delays in renovation and demolition schedules and minimizes the cost to the divisions that own the spaces.
    22. Emergency Procedures and Equipment (Work Process V). The following sections from Work Process V of this program specifies procedures, actions, and points- of-contact for emergencies involving chemicals:
      1. Spill Response Procedures
      2. Personal Injury from or Exposure to Chemicals
      3. Emergency First Aid for Phenol Exposure
      4. Emergency Eyewash and Safety Showers
      5. Fire Extinguishers
    23. Training (Work Process W). Training for employees working in areas where hazardous materials are present is completed at three levels:
      1. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Training (Course EHS0348): This online course reviews provisions for the CHSP as well as information about the Plan, chemical hazards and controls, and operation/procedure-specific training.
      2. Operations/procedure specific training provided individually or to small groups by the line manager. This training reviews hazards of an employee's assigned work.
    24. Hazard Information (Work Process X). Information regarding the hazards of chemicals is conveyed in two primary ways: Material Safety Data Sheets and labels/placards.
      1. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)
        1. An MSDS provides safety and health related information such as known hazards of the material, its physical and chemical properties, exposure limits, precautionary measures, and emergency and first-aid procedures. Additional information on How to Read an MSDS is provided in the CHSP appendices.
        2. MSDSs are required for all hazardous materials and must be readily accessible to Berkeley Lab employees. Note: MSDSs are not required for consumer products (e.g., Formula 409 All-Purpose Cleaner) provided it is used in the manner intended by the manufacturer. 
        3. MSDSs may be accessed from the EHS Chemical Safety Web page.
      2. Container Labeling (Work Process Y): Labels are required for all primary and secondary containers of hazardous materials except where noted in the CHSP. Labels are also required on containers that are shipped off site. Labels shall be clearly legible and written in English. Primary containers are the original containers received from the manufacturer, distributor, or vendor. Secondary containers are jars, cans, squeeze bottles, and other containers to which hazardous materials are transferred by an individual.
    25. Hazard Communication Requirements for Chemicals Produced in Laboratories and Shipped Off Site (Work Process Z)
      1. Berkeley Lab is considered by federal OSHA to be a chemical manufacturer or distributor if chemicals produced in laboratories are shipped off site. Berkeley Lab is required to communicate chemical hazards through MSDSs and labels. There is no exemption based on quantity. These hazard communication requirements are delineated in the CHSP Work Process Z, Control Procedures for Chemicals Produced in Laboratories and Shipped Off Site.
      2. Posting Area Entrances (Work Process AA): Area safety leaders must ensure that entrances to technical areas are posted with a caution placard that indicates the hazard types in the work area (such as corrosives and carcinogens) as depicted by hazard icons, minimum PPE requirements, and emergency contact information. 
    26. Designated Areas (Work Process BB)
      1. Designated areas are specific locations within a laboratory for work involving particularly hazardous substances and engineered nanomaterials. The purpose of designated areas is to ensure that proper controls are in place and that all activities involving these higher-hazard materials are confined within the designated area.
      2. Designated areas can be a piece of equipment, such as a fume hood or a centrifuge, or they can be entire labs. However, it is best to limit the number and size of designated areas to the minimum needed because additional control procedures are required.
      3. The work lead must establish and post designated areas.
    27. Exposure Assessments, Medical Monitoring, and Medical Consultation (Work Process CC)
      1. Hazard Assessments: Hazard assessments are conducted to identify the hazards and necessary controls for chemicals used in shop, field, and laboratory work environments. These preliminary evaluations are part of the Job Hazards Analysis (JHA) process and can be performed by the line manager, work lead, supervisor, or an EHS professional. Hazard assessments may precede exposure assessments conducted by EHS professionals to ensure that protective measures are implemented and to ensure that the proper level of work authorization is obtained. Exposure assessments are required prior to issuing or using respiratory protection equipment. For more information on hazard and exposure assessments, refer to the ES&H Manual Exposure Assessment program.
      2. Exposure Assessments
        1. An exposure assessment is a formal evaluation process performed and documented by EHS professionals. The exposure assessment is conducted to determine the risk of personnel exposure to hazardous chemical or physical agents, and the adequacy of hazard controls. Results of exposure assessments are used to validate or improve hazard controls, to extend the same controls to employees with similar exposures, to monitor employee health by providing employees with appropriate medical tests and examinations (i.e., medical surveillance), and to demonstrate compliance with regulations. The ES&H Manual Job Hazards Analysis program describes this process in more detail.
        2. Exposure assessments may be either qualitative or quantitative assessments of risk. Qualitative exposure assessments result from observation and the use of professional judgment, whereas quantitative assessments involve conducting measurements (i.e., exposure monitoring) or estimating or modeling of exposures.
      3. Exposure Monitoring: If there is reason to believe that use of a chemical may produce airborne levels above applicable limits (regardless of occupational setting), then air-exposure monitoring will be conducted. If initial monitoring indicates exposures above one-half of the applicable limits, follow-up monitoring will be conducted. Moreover, controls (such as work practices, training, personal protective equipment, engineering, ongoing air monitoring and medical surveillance) will either be put into place or enhanced, based on the judgment of the industrial hygienist and any specific OSHA standard that may apply. Monitoring will be terminated when successive follow-up measurements indicate exposures are below one-half of the applicable occupational exposure limit (OEL).
      4. Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) and Interpretation of Monitoring Results: Air-sampling results are compared to exposure limits to determine whether the potential for hazardous exposure exists. Several individual substances have both OSHA and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) exposure limits. In some cases, the values of these two limits are different. In accordance with Berkeley Lab's Work Smart Standards, the lower of the two limits is used to interpret exposure results.
      5. Employee Notification of Monitoring
        1. The industrial hygienist conducting the exposure-monitoring will give written notification of the monitoring results to the employee (and employee's supervisor) in accordance with the specific OSHA requirements for that substance. Where no criterion exists, monitoring results will be provided within 15 days of receiving analytical results from the laboratory performing the analyses.
        2. Health Services will also be notified of exposure monitoring results.
        3. Monitoring records will be managed by the Industrial Hygiene Group.
      6. Medical Consultations and Examinations
        1. Medical consultations and examinations related to employee exposure are provided by Health Services (ext. 6266) to any employee exposed at or above an Action Level (or in the absence of an established AL, one-half the lower of the OSHA PEL or the ACGIH TLV); when an employee develops a sign or symptom of exposure to a hazardous material; or when an uncontrolled event such as a spill, leak, or explosion takes place in which there is a likelihood of employee exposure. Anyone with a concern or question may request a medical consultation. Health Services should also be consulted by women who are either pregnant or intend on becoming pregnant.
        2. Medical consultations and examinations will be conducted in accordance with policies and procedures described in the Health Services program in the Berkeley Lab ES&H Manual.

    E. Roles and Responsibilities

    Roles and responsibilities of Berkeley Lab personnel are delineated below:

    F. Definitions/Acronyms

    Term

    Definition

    Activity Hazard Document (AHD)

    The Activity Hazard Document identifies the elevated hazards associated with higher hazard work and defines the appropriate controls associated with those elevated hazards. The AHD document is reviewed and approved by the line management responsible for the work and is stored in a secure database. Once fully approved, the AHD document serves as an authorization for those qualified and approved workers listed in the AHD. The AHD database serves as the primary tool for developing an AHD.

    American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists is a voluntary membership organization of professional industrial hygiene personnel in governmental or educational institutions. The ACGIH develops and publishes recommended occupational exposure limits each year called threshold limit values (TLVs) for hundreds of chemicals, physical agents, and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs), to assess worker exposure.

    American National Standards Institute (ANSI)

    ANSI is a privately funded voluntary organization that develops standards for the safe design and operation of equipment and safe practices or procedures for industry.

    Chemical Hygiene Officer

    A person designated by the employer who is qualified, by training or experience, to provide technical guidance in the development and implementation of the provisions of the Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan.

    Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP)

    The CHP is a written program developed and implemented by the employer. The CHP sets forth procedures, equipment, personal protective equipment, and work practices that are capable of protecting employees from the health hazards presented by hazardous chemicals used in the particular workplace.

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP)

    The written Web-based program developed by Berkeley Lab to comply with the federal OSHA "Lab Standard." The CHSP addresses all elements of the OSHA-mandated Chemical Hygiene Plan and provides further information specific to Berkeley Lab.

    Concentration

    The relative amount of a given substance present when mixed with another substance(s). Concentration is often expressed as parts per million (ppm), percent, or weight per unit volume, e.g., milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3).

    U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT)

    DOT is the federal agency that regulates the labeling and transportation of hazardous materials.

    EHS

    Berkeley Lab's Environment/Health/Safety Division

    Hazard warning

    The words, pictures, and symbols, or combination thereof, that appear on a label and indicate the hazards of the substance in the container

    Hazardous chemical

    A chemical for which there is statistically significant evidence based on at least one study conducted in accordance with established scientific principles that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed employees. The term "health hazard" includes chemicals that are carcinogens, toxic or highly toxic agents, reproductive toxins, irritants, corrosives, sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents that act on the hematopoietic system, and agents that damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes. Berkeley Lab expands this definition to include chemicals that also pose physical hazards. A chemical is a physical hazard if it has flammable, combustible, explosive, oxidizing, pyrophoric, or reactive properties, or if it is an organic peroxide or compressed gas.

    Health hazards

    Substances for which there is evidence, from at least one scientific study, that acute or chronic health effects may occur in exposed persons. These chemicals include carcinogens, toxic agents, reproductive toxins (mutagens and teratogens), irritants, corrosives, sensitizers, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, neurotoxins, agents that act on the hematopoietic system, and agents that damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes.

    Hazardous material

    Any substance or compound that has the capability of producing adverse effects on the health and safety of humans. This term is used interchangeably with hazardous chemicals.

    Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)

    Job Hazards Analysis requires line management to describe the scope of work for each job, determine the hazards of that work, and define the controls appropriate for those hazards. The documentation of that analysis and the assigned tasks, once fully approved by line management, serves as work authorization for the individual assigned to perform the work. The JHA document is maintained as an electronic record in the JHA database.

    National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)

    This organization provides information on fire protection and prevention. The NFPA 704 "Standard of the Identification of the Fire Hazards of Materials" describes a hazard warning labeling system. This system rates the hazard of a material during a fire. These hazards are divided into health, flammability, and reactivity hazards, and appear in a well-known diamond system using numerals from zero through four to indicate severity of the hazard. Zero indicates no special hazard, and four indicates severe hazard.

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

    This government agency develops and enforces occupational safety and health standards for most industry and business in the United States.

    Permissible exposure limit (PEL)

    An exposure limit that is published and enforced by OSHA as a legal standard. PEL may be either a time weighted average (TWA) exposure limit (8 hours), a 15-minute short-term exposure limit (STEL), or a ceiling (C). The PELs are found in Tables Z-1, Z-2, or Z-3 of OSHA regulations 1910.1000. (See also TLV). "SKIN" notation: This designation sometimes appears alongside a TLV or PEL. It refers to the possibility of absorption of the particular chemical through the skin and eyes. Thus, protection of large surface areas of skin should be considered to prevent skin absorption so that the TLV is not invalidated.

    Personal protective equipment (PPE)

    Any devices or clothing worn by the worker to protect against hazards in the environment. Examples are respirators, gloves, and chemical splash goggles.

    Respirator

    A device that is designed to protect the wearer from inhaling harmful contaminants.

    Safety line managers/management

    Supervisors, managers, and work leads are part of the safety line management chain, from each worker to the Laboratory Director. Supervisors and managers are part of the formal management chain, and they have the responsibility for adhering to all EHS policies and safe work practices. Work leads (who may be non-management) derive authority from formal Laboratory managers and/or supervisors to ensure that day-to-day work, operations, and activities in their assigned area(s) and activities are conducted safely and within established work authorizations. Supervisors, managers, and work leads are collectively referred to as "safety line managers."

    Short-term exposure limit (STEL)

    Represented as STEL or TLV-STEL, this is the maximum concentration to which workers can be exposed for a short period of time (15 minutes), for only four times throughout the day, and with at least one hour between exposures. In addition, the daily TLV-TWA must not be exceeded.

    Technical area

    Technical areas generally include laboratories, shops, workrooms, and similar areas. Offices, conference rooms, food preparation, and consumption areas such as the cafeteria, kitchenettes, and break rooms are generally not technical areas.

    Threshold limit value  (TLV)

    Airborne concentrations, devised by the ACGIH, of substances that represent conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be exposed to day after day with no adverse effect. TLVs are advisory exposure guidelines, not legal standards, that are based on evidence from industrial experience, animal studies, or human studies, when they exist. There are three different types of TLVs: Time weighted average (TLV-TWA), short-term exposure limit (TLV-STEL), and ceiling (TLV-C). (See also PEL.) The notation "SKIN," which sometimes appears alongside a TLV or PEL, refers to the possibility of absorption of the particular chemical through the skin and eyes. Thus, protection of large surface areas of skin should be considered to prevent skin absorption so that the TLV is not invalidated.

    Threshold limit value ceiling (TLV-C)

    The maximum concentration of a toxic substance for which exposure is allowed. This limit is not to be exceeded, even momentarily. The TWA must still be observed.

    Time weighted average (TWA)

    The exposure limit averaged over a normal 8-hour workday or 40-hour workweek.

    Work leads

    Work leads (who may be non-management) derive authority from formal Laboratory managers and/or supervisors to ensure that day-to-day work, operations, and activities in their assigned area(s) and activities are conducted safely and within established work authorizations.

    G. Recordkeeping Requirements

    • Maintain up-to-date caution placards at all entryways to technical areas.
    • Keep AHDs up-to-date and currently authorized for work performed that require them.

    H. Implementing Documents

    Document number

    Title

    Type

    07.07.005.001

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Program

    07.07.005.002

    Work Process A, General Requirements

    Process

    07.07.005.003

    Work Process B, Chemical and Equipment Procurement

    Process

    07.07.005.004

    Work Process C, Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.005

    Work Process D, Berkeley Lab Chemical Management System (Chemical Inventory)

    Process

    07.07.005.006

    Work Process E, Chemical Hazard Descriptions

    Process

    07.07.005.007

    Work Process F, Chemical Hazard Assessments

    Process

    07.07.005.008

    Work Process G, General Controls for Hazardous Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.009

    Work Process H, Selection and Use of Engineering Controls

    Process

    07.07.005.010

    Work Process I, Personal Protective Equipment

    Process

    07.07.005.011

    Work Process J, Work Practices Controls

    Process

    07.07.005.012

    Work Process K, Chemical Storage

    Process

    07.07.005.013

    Work Process L, Specific Controls and Procedures – Acids and Bases

    Process

    07.07.005.014

    Work Process M, Specific Controls and Procedures – Particularly Hazardous Substances: Carcinogens, Reproductive Toxins, and Acute Toxins

    Process

    07.07.005.015

    Work Process N, Specific Controls and Procedures – Flammables and Combustible Liquids

    Process

    07.07.005.016

    Work Process O, Specific Controls and Procedures – Laser Dyes and Solvents

    Process

    07.07.005.017

    Work Process P, Specific Controls and Procedures – Peroxide-Forming Compounds

    Process

    07.07.005.018

    Work Process Q, Specific Controls and Procedures – Water-Reactive Chemicals

    Process

    07.07.005.019

    Work Process R, Specific Controls and Procedures – Pyrophoric Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.020

    Work Process S, Specific Controls and Procedures – Engineered Nanomaterials

    Process

    07.07.005.021

    Work Process T, Specific Controls and Procedures – Chemicals with Explosive Properties

    Process

    07.07.005.022

    Work Process U, Decommissioning Equipment, Buildings, Laboratories, and Shop Spaces

    Process

    07.07.005.023

    Work Process V, Emergency Procedures and Equipment

    Process

    07.07.005.024

    Work Process W, Training

    Process

    07.07.005.025

    Work Process X, Hazard Information

    Process

    07.07.005.026

    Work Process Y, Container Labeling

    Process

    07.07.005.027

    Work Process Z, Hazard Communication Requirements for Chemicals Produced in Laboratories and Shipped Off Site

    Process

    07.07.005.028

    Work Process AA, Posting Area Entrances

    Process

    07.07.005.029

    Work Process BB, Designated Areas

    Process

    07.07.005.030

    Work Process CC, Exposure Assessments, Medical Monitoring, and Medical Consultation

    Process

    07.07.013.001

    Exposure Assessment

    Program

    02.13.002.000

    Health Services Program

    Program

    I. Contact Information

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Program Manager
    EHS Division

    J. Revision History

    Date

    Revision

    By whom

    Revision Description

    Section(s) affected

    Change Type

    1/2/2012

    0

    L. McLouth

    Re-write for wiki (brief)

    All

    Minor

    12/13/2013

    1

    L. McLouth

    Re-write for wiki (policy)

    All

    Minor

    DOCUMENT INFORMATION

    Title:

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Document number

    07.07.005.000

    Revision number

    1

    Publication date:

    12/13/2013

    Effective date:

    12/13/2013

    Next review date:

    12/13/2016

    Policy Area:

    Industrial Hygiene and Safety

    RPM Section (home)

    ESH

    RPM Section (cross-reference)

    none

    Functional Division

    EHS

    Prior reference information (optional)

    CHSP Website

    Source Requirements Documents

    • 29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard Communication
    • 29 CFR 1910.1450 Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories (Chemical Hygiene Plan)
    • DOE Order 456.1 The Safe Handling of Unbound Engineered Nanoparticles
    • 10 CFR 851.21 Hazard identification and assessment.
    • 10 CFR 851.23 Safety and health standard

    Implementing Documents

    Document number

    Title

    Type

    07.07.005.001

    Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    Program

    07.07.005.002

    Work Process A, General Requirements

    Process

    07.07.005.003

    Work Process B, Chemical and Equipment Procurement

    Process

    07.07.005.004

    Work Process C, Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.005

    Work Process D, Berkeley Lab Chemical Management System (Chemical Inventory)

    Process

    07.07.005.006

    Work Process E, Chemical Hazard Descriptions

    Process

    07.07.005.007

    Work Process F, Chemical Hazard Assessments

    Process

    07.07.005.008

    Work Process G, General Controls for Hazardous Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.009

    Work Process H, Selection and Use of Engineering Controls

    Process

    07.07.005.010

    Work Process I, Personal Protective Equipment

    Process

    07.07.005.011

    Work Process J, Work Practices Controls

    Process

    07.07.005.012

    Work Process K, Chemical Storage

    Process

    07.07.005.013

    Work Process L, Specific Controls and Procedures – Acids and Bases

    Process

    07.07.005.014

    Work Process M, Specific Controls and Procedures – Particularly Hazardous Substances: Carcinogens, Reproductive Toxins, and Acute Toxins

    Process

    07.07.005.015

    Work Process N, Specific Controls and Procedures – Flammables and Combustible Liquids

    Process

    07.07.005.016

    Work Process O, Specific Controls and Procedures – Laser Dyes and Solvents

    Process

    07.07.005.017

    Work Process P, Specific Controls and Procedures – Peroxide-Forming Compounds

    Process

    07.07.005.018

    Work Process Q, Specific Controls and Procedures – Water-Reactive Chemicals

    Process

    07.07.005.019

    Work Process R, Specific Controls and Procedures – Pyrophoric Materials

    Process

    07.07.005.020

    Work Process S, Specific Controls and Procedures – Engineered Nanomaterials

    Process

    07.07.005.021

    Work Process T, Specific Controls and Procedures – Chemicals with Explosive Properties

    Process

    07.07.005.022

    Work Process U, Decommissioning Equipment, Buildings, Laboratories, and Shop Spaces

    Process

    07.07.005.023

    Work Process V, Emergency Procedures and Equipment

    Process

    07.07.005.024

    Work Process W, Training

    Process

    07.07.005.025

    Work Process X, Hazard Information

    Process

    07.07.005.026

    Work Process Y, Container Labeling

    Process

    07.07.005.027

    Work Process Z, Hazard Communication Requirements for Chemicals Produced in Laboratories and Shipped Off Site

    Process

    07.07.005.028

    Work Process AA, Posting Area Entrances

    Process

    07.07.005.029

    Work Process BB, Designated Areas

    Process

    07.07.005.030

    Work Process CC, Exposure Assessments, Medical Monitoring, and Medical Consultation

    Process

    07.07.013.001

    Exposure Assessment

    Program

    02.13.002.000

    Health Services Program

    Program

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