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Some Lab users are experiencing problems with Windows Updates. We are currently working to fix the problem and prevent anyone from being isolated due to the MS17-010 security patch. Please let the Help Desk know if you are experiencing any problems by emailing help@lbl.gov or calling x4357.

In a real-time demonstration, seven vendors of network equipment came together to successfully test the interoperability of FAUCET, an open-source SDN (software-defined networking) controller. The March 30 event was sponsored by Google, LBLnet (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s internal network) and ESnet, the U.S. Department of Energy’s high-speed international network managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Simeon Miteff, an LBLnet network manager in IT, was the lead organizer of the event.

The demonstration was organized to sustain momentum for SDN -- an emerging technology that decouples the network control plane from the actual data which flows across the network on the data plane. By doing so, SDN introduces the concept of programmability into the network, allowing application owners and network operators to customize network software to meet their needs.

For SDN to realize its potential, it must be interoperable among network vendors while bringing different (and advanced) capabilities to network operators. FAUCET enables verification of this interoperability through a common API, OpenFlow. FAUCET, originally developed at REANNZ and the University of Waikato in New Zealand with the support of Google and others, was created to bring the benefits of SDN to a typical enterprise network and has been deployed in various settings.

The demo was run on switches running Openflow v1.3.x. Designed as a drop-in replacement for a non-SDN switch, FAUCET-controlled hardware provides additional SDN based functionality as well (for example, policy based L2/L3 forwarding and multi vendor stacking). Once each vendor had demonstrated support individually, multi-vendor control and dataplane interoperability was demonstrated by building a virtual switch composed of switches from each vendor, under the control of a single FAUCET controller, able to pass real networking traffic across the room (and therefore a real network).

This demonstration of multi-vendor interoperability creates a collaborative environment between vendors and demonstrates maturity of the Openflow substrate as well as the FAUCET SDN controller, as discussed in a 2016 technical paper on deploying FAUCET, coauthored by Googlers Josh Bailey and Stephen Stuart, who supported the event.

FAUCET has been deployed at multiple organizations across the world  and recently was used to host the NZNOG 2017 meeting in New Zealand. 

“This live interoperability demo led to some great technical conversations with the vendors, and the enthusiasm of all the participants made this both a productive and enjoyable gathering,” said Simeon Miteff, an LBLnet network manager who was the lead organizer of the event. 

Josh Bailey, a Google software engineer who is a technical lead on FAUCET and co-author of the paper with Stuart, found the hands-on demo useful as he made the rounds of vendors, answering questions and helping to debug the installs. 

Bailey maintains an active blog on FAUCET at https://faucet-sdn.blogspot.com/.

“Multi-vendor interoperability is critical for network providers like ESnet to get confidence about deploying SDN software and technology, while not being subject to vendor lock-in,” said Inder Monga, director of ESnet and long-time contributor to SDN efforts in the industry.

Vendors participating in the demo are (in alphabetical order) Allied Telesis, Cisco, HPE (wired and Aruba wireless products), Netronome, NoviFlow and Intel OpenVSwitch with DPDK. This group plans to hold such interoperability gatherings at a yearly cadence, while continuing the momentum to add new features to the FAUCET open-source software.


Problems with the Lab's outbound and inbound calling provider caused service interruptions beginning at 8AM today.

All Services have now been restored.  

 

Zoom became our supported video conferencing tool about 18 months ago.   Everyone at the Laboratory can be automatically provisioned for an account.  Zoom provides both audio conferencing (including by regular old telephone dialin) and clear sharp video conferencing and screen sharing.  Let's check in on a month at LBL with Zoom...

Here's a snapshot of Zoom use at LBL in February:

 

The top 10 users used 71,222 Meeting Minutes!

Top users include NERSC, ESnet, Chemical Sciences, IT, Biosciences, and Systems Biology.

 

 

Join the 693 registered users at LBL at go.lbl.gov/zoom

 

Telephone Services will be performing upgrades to the parts of the Laboratory's telephone and voicemail systems on Saturday, March 11. The following services will be affected.
Between 9:00 am - 11:00 am : Voice mail for all Lab staff will be unavailable. This includes callers not being able to leave a message and users will not be able to retrieve existing messages.
Between 10:00 am and 1:00 pm :Occupants of buildings 30, 33, 46, 59, 71, 76 and 78 will not be able to receive incoming calls or to place internal calls to other LBL buildings not listed. To reach someone in one of the buildings not listed, staff can dial 9 and the person's seven digit phone number. Calls to outside numbers and E911 service will not be affected.

The IT Servers Applications and Middleware Support (SAMS) Group performed infrastructure upgrades on February 21, 2017 from 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM.  During this period, Commons (Confluence) and Conferences (Indico) were not accessible.  Check this page for updates on this scheduled outage.

Fresh from IT February 2017

IT regularly makes visits to divisions, projects, and areas to talk about what's new in IT.   Here are notes from the EESA townhall we did today.  If you're logged into GSuite with your @lbl account you can see the slides embedded below too:

 

Tools I covered:

Questions or Suggestions:   Please email help@lbl.gov 

 

Smartsheet users are currently experiencing connectivity issues to Smartsheet.  We are awaiting information from Smartsheet on this issue and will update this blog post as we obtain more information.  For Smartsheet status, visit this page.

 

Identified - We're currently experiencing some delay issues with the search and reporting functionality in Smartsheet. We're aware of the issue and are working to get it fixed right away. Thanks for your patience. 
Feb 2, 10:32 PST
Monitoring - The recent technical issue has been resolved, and we are currently monitoring the Smartsheet application to make sure everything is operating normally 
Feb 2, 10:27 PST

Update - Our operations team is continuing to work on a resolution. Thank you for your patience. 
Feb 2, 09:54 PST

Identified - We have identified the problem and are continuing to work to resolve the issue. 
Feb 2, 08:58 PST

Investigating - The Smartsheet Application is currently experiencing some technical issues. We are aware of the issue and are working to get it fixed right away. Thanks for your patience. 
Feb 2, 08:29 PST
Telephone Services will be performing upgrades to the parts of the Laboratory's telephone and voicemail systems. The following services will be affected.
Between 7:00 am - 8:00 am:  Occupants of buildings 30, 33, 46, 59, 71, 76 and 78 will not be able to receive incoming calls or to place internal calls to other LBL buildings not listed. To reach someone in one of the buildings not listed, you can dial 9 and the person's seven digit phone number. Calls to outside numbers and E911 service will not be affected.   Voice mail for all Lab staff will be unavailable. This includes callers not being able to leave a message and users will not be able to retrieve existing messages.
Between 9:00 am and 1:00 pm: Voice mail for all Lab staff will be unavailable. This includes callers not being able to leave a message and users will not be able to retrieve existing messages.
If you have any questions or comments regarding the planned outage, you may contact Telephone Services at TSC@lbl.gov or call ext. 7997.

Smartsheet is currently experiencing an outage that is affecting access to their service for some users.  We are currently waiting resolution from Smartsheet, but have not received an estimated time of resolution.  For further information on Smartsheet status click here.

Update from Smartsheet:

Update - This morning at 9:00, Smartsheet users in multiple geographic locations experienced issues connecting to the application. While working with our network provider, they identified an incorrect configuration. They restarted their service which appears to have corrected a bad route configuration at 3:57 PM pacific time and Operations verified a return to normal levels of traffic. We are continuing to work with the network provider and monitor the network activity and the application to ensure this issue is resolved. 
Jan 26, 17:45 PST
Update - The recent technical issue causing a loss of connectivity for some users of the Smartsheet application has been corrected. We are continuing to monitor the issue at this time to ensure traffic flows as expected. 
Jan 26, 17:12 PST
Monitoring - Some users of the Smartsheet application are reporting issues when attempting to access the application. At this time, we have verified that the Smartsheet application is functioning normally and that this problem is an external network event causing general connectivity issues for users in specific regions. 
Jan 26, 10:03 PST

 

The Sympa server which runs the mailing list service was down for about 2 minutes starting on 12/16 at 7 PM for necessary infrastructure maintenance.

During the upgrade, Sympa lists (including level1 lists) were unavailable.

Any messages sent to list addresses (@lists.lbl.gov) were delivered after the outage completed.

The autoreply.lbl.gov server which runs the autoreply/vacation message service was down for about 2 minutes starting on 12/16 at 7PM for necessary infrastructure maintenance.

Any messages sent to @autoreply.bl.gov addresses during the outage have been delivered since the outage has completed.

Smartsheet will be offline on December 10, 2016 from 5:00 PM Pacific to 9 PM Pacific for system improvements.

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), an Organized Research Unit of the University of California, San Diego, is making major high-performance computing resources available to the UC community. This program, HPC@UC, is being offered in partnership with the UC Vice Chancellors of Research as well as campus CIOs. Awards under this program are intended to help UC researchers expand their overall research program. Specifically, this program is designed to:

  • Broaden the base of UC researchers who use advanced computing
  • Seed promising computational research Facilitate collaborations between SDSC and UC researchers
  • Give UC researchers access to cyberinfrastructure that complements what is available at their campus
  • Help UC researchers be successful when pursuing larger allocation requests through NSF’s Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment program (XSEDE), and other national computing programs

Advanced cyberinfrastructure (CI), including high-performance computing (HPC) systems, is critical to advancing science and discovery across a wide range of research domains. SDSC operates some of the most advanced CI in the nation, including a petascale computing system for conducting complex numerical simulations, and high-performance storage systems for moving, analyzing, and storing massive amounts of data from simulation and experiment. SDSC’s HPC applications specialists, data scientists, and systems administrators provide the support and expertise required to make maximum use of these resources. Access to the resources is ubiquitous over high-speed networks between the campuses, with specialized hardware that enables data movement at speeds in the tens of Gigabits per second. Resources Available

  • Comet supercomputer: A ~2 PFlop/s systems featuring 1,944 nodes, each with two 12-core Intel Haswell processors, 128 GB memory and 320 GB of flash storage; 36 GPU nodes each with two NVIDIA K80 GPGPUs; and 4 large memory nodes, each with 4 Intel Haswell processors, and 1.5 TB of memory;
  • Gordon supercomputer: A ~340 Tflop/s system featuring 1,024 two-socket nodes with Intel Sandy Bridge processors and 64 GB memory/node; and 300 TB of high performance flash memory;
  • Data Resources: Over 7 PB of high-speed storage made available via Lustre parallel file systems, as either short term Performance Storage used for temporary files, or long term, non-purged Project Storage that persists for the life of the project. A Durable Storage resource provides a second copy of all data in Project Storage file system;
  • Applications: A large installed base of applications for HPC and big data analytics;
  • Expertise: SDSC staff have broad expertise in the application of advanced computing and stand ready to assist you in making the best use of these resources for your research.

Trial Accounts on Comet: Before submitting an allocation request to HPC@UC, you may also want to consider requesting a Trial account on SDSC’s Comet system. These are allocations for 1000 core-hours and are intended for very quick assessment of Comet to see if it meets your needs. These requests are fulfilled within 2 working days. You are eligible for an HPC@UC allocation even if you already have a Trial account. Eligibility and Review

  • Applications may request up to 1M core-hours of computing, associated data storage, and access to SDSC expertise to assist their research team. Awards are active for one year.
  • Applicants must not have an active award in the NSF’s Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery (XSEDE) program.
  • The expectation is that these awards will lead to larger, formal allocation requests on national HPC systems that are available through the XSEDE program. SDSC staff will assist in developing these allocation applications.
  • Applications are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Applicants will be notified within 10 business days of the review decision.

Eligibility and Review

  • Applications may request up to 1M core-hours of computing, associated data storage, and access to SDSC expertise to assist their research team. Awards are active for one year.
  • Applicants must not have an active award in the NSF’s Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery (XSEDE) program.
  • The expectation is that these awards will lead to larger, formal allocation requests on national HPC systems that are available through the XSEDE program. SDSC staff will assist in developing these allocation applications.
  • Applications are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Applicants will be notified within 10 business days of the review decision.

Apply 

 

HelloSign will experience a planned outage to upgrade key aspects of their infrastructure on Saturday, November 19th starting at 10pm Pacific, lasting for approximately 1 hour.

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